Quick Reference: Web Accessibility

Principles of Accessibility Perceivable – Available through sight, hearing, or touch. Operable – Compatible with keyboard or mouse. Understandable – User-friendly, easy to comprehend. Robust – Works across browsers, assistive technologies, mobile devices, old devices/browsers, etc. Follows standards. Provide appropriate alternative text Every non-text element needs a text alternative (alt text) that provides an equivalent 

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Accessible Screen Fonts

Fonts which are easier to read on screens, especially for the visually impaired. Font Recommendations There are a great number of fonts which could be eligible for use as an accessible screen font. The ones I’ve chosen to show here are some of my favourites, and are all available free of charge. Remember to check 

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Designing for the Completely Blind: Screen Readers

Popular Screen Readers By the term ‘completely blind’ I am referring to users who do not use the internet as a visual medium at all. These are people who most often make the use of screen readers to convey the printed word into a spoken alternative. Popular Screen Readers include: Screen Reader Operating System Availability 

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Style Switchers for Accessibility

I’ve been working on a Disability information website, aptly called Disability Information Zone: http://www.disabilityinformationzone.co.uk/. Based in Coventry UK, I’m in the process of amassing a database (well, not exactly a database, but a page of published data) detailing an assortment of disability information for Disabled People in Coventry & Warwickshire. This can be found at: 

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ARIA Landmarks* for Screen Readers

HTML WAI-ARIA roles help screen reader users. *Landmark according to W3C means: “A type of region on a page to which the user may want quick access. Content in such a region is different from that of other regions on the page and relevant to a specific user purpose, such as navigating, searching, perusing the 

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Notes on Accessible Web Design

Website Accessibility Label everything so that assistive technology can read it. All images require alt tags; all links, title tags. Keep your code clean! See document: “What Beautiful HTML looks like” – Use appropriate tags; don’t use tables for layout. Separate presentation from content; html should contain no styling – leave that to the CSS. 

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